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Autodesk 123D Catch

(formerly Autodesk PhotoFly)


Autodesk 123D Catch

Autodesk 123D catch

This application is intended to take a series of overlapping photographs, correlate them, create a 3-dimensional model that can be developed into an animated movie by tweening between image stills, and eventually saving the 3D model as a 3D AutoCAD drawing.


3-dimensional Model of Sun 50 Potbelly Stove

Autodesk 123D Catch Experiment Rendering a 3D Model of our Potbelly Stove

I have just started experimenting with this cloud-based application, originally called Autodesk PhotoFly in November 2011. The first attempt was with a shiny skeleton clock, but there was too much reflections between the parts for it to work out well. The second attempt was with a rusted milk can from a dairy farm in Lebanon, New Hampshire. The third attempt was an oil lamp, but its shiney features did not render well at all. This is the fourth attempt, still not perfect, and not anywhere as smooth-looking as it should be.

A 3-dimensional model of our coal-burning potbelly stove, created from dozens of overlapping photographs, using Autodesk's 123D Catch (formerly known as PhotoFly). The rust stain is from a planter pot saucer that cracked and leaked onto the top of the stove. An easy fix to clean up with a good coating of black stove polish and curing with a propane torch, outdoors, of course.

The goal of this experiment is to finish with an AutoCAD 3D drawing, with each facet rendered using the texture from the photographs. 123D Catch supposedly supports it as an export file type, but so far (it is in Beta testing right now) it just creates an empty drawing file in 2010 AutoCAD format.


Autodesk 123D Catch (formerly Autodesk Photofly)

Autodesk 123D Catch (formerly Autodesk Photofly)

I have just started experimenting with this cloud-based application in November 2011. The first attempt was with a shiny skeleton clock, but there was too much reflections between the parts for it to work out well. The second attempt was with a rusted milk can from a dairy farm in Lebanon, New Hampshire. I created an animation of it and uploaded it to YouTube, but nothing has appeared in my channel there, yet. The final result, after I shoot some more photos to increase the resolution of the model, will be a 3D AutoCAD drawing, with textures.

About this Webpage

I have created this webpage as a method to document and share the various computer applications that I use, both at work and at home.

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